Maritime Merriment

bifanoland:

Was digging through my old work folder and came across these roughs from last summer. They were originally going to be shown at a theme-park gallery run by a company that rhymes with “Bisney”. Needless to say, there was some weirdness with contract stuff and the project fell through. Thought it would be fun to share these anyhow!

theanimationarchive:

Assorted storyboards from the Walt Disney production of Bambi (1942). The top image was drawn by Disney animator and Imagineer, Marc Davis.

freystupid:

from  Library of World Literature for Children

N.I. Maltsev, Russian illustrator

rufftoon:

ca-tsuka:

Zombillenium, an upcoming french animated feature film directed by Arthur de Pins.

The comic book was a lot of fun. It will be interesting to see the adaptation, storywise. 

As for looks, I wonder if it will be similar to the music video, set into the Zombillenium world

http://youtu.be/6XEaAaLRVYo

victongai:

Spellbound
Victo Ngai
For a article in Dension magazine about Fairy Tales and the changing nature of how these stories are told — from Grimm’s tales, to the super-scrubbed happy Disney tales through to the darker popularity of shows like Breaking Bad now. Fairy tale expert Maria Tatar also discusses how some of the world’s oldest tales help us navigate modern life.
Big thanks to Erin from Em Dash for this very interesting project!

victongai:

Spellbound

Victo Ngai

For a article in Dension magazine about Fairy Tales and the changing nature of how these stories are told — from Grimm’s tales, to the super-scrubbed happy Disney tales through to the darker popularity of shows like Breaking Bad now. Fairy tale expert Maria Tatar also discusses how some of the world’s oldest tales help us navigate modern life.

Big thanks to Erin from Em Dash for this very interesting project!

beautiful-basque-country:

Here is the second part of one of our most successful posts, “Folk Faces" by photographer Asier Bastida. These portraits are exhibited in the Bilbao underground stations to promote the 40th International Folkore Festival of Portugalete.

A-ma-zing work!

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Looking at The Man in the Chair (1876), you probably won’t find the British Museum’s comment about Henri de Braekeleer to be a revelation: “Strongly influenced by seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish genre painting.”
Certainly the bright, clear light streaming in through the open windows—and the red chair (with its brass studs and turned legs) that the light falls on—evoke the Dutch Golden Age.
The gilt-leather wall hangings, called Cuir de Cordoue, practically quote Pieter de Hooch:

Interestingly, though, a few elements of the scene stand clearly (and deliberately) anachronic to that influence.
Most obvious, of course, is the tired—and modern—subject seated in the chair.
Directly above him, though, is a painting that says “Titian” more than it says “de Hooch.” And above that, a sculpture of a saintly bishop that more than likely predates the Protestant Reformation.
Now, either or both could easily be original to a 17th-century Dutch interior: an interest in the art of the past didn’t spring up, whole and unprecedented, in the middle of the 19th century.
But they do suggest an awareness, on de Braekeleer’s part, of his own work’s resonance with the past he evokes.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Looking at The Man in the Chair (1876), you probably won’t find the British Museum’s comment about Henri de Braekeleer to be a revelation: “Strongly influenced by seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish genre painting.”

Certainly the bright, clear light streaming in through the open windows—and the red chair (with its brass studs and turned legs) that the light falls on—evoke the Dutch Golden Age.

The gilt-leather wall hangings, called Cuir de Cordoue, practically quote Pieter de Hooch:

Pieter de Hooch, Interior with Figures, 1663–1665

Interestingly, though, a few elements of the scene stand clearly (and deliberately) anachronic to that influence.

Most obvious, of course, is the tired—and modern—subject seated in the chair.

Directly above him, though, is a painting that says “Titian” more than it says “de Hooch.” And above that, a sculpture of a saintly bishop that more than likely predates the Protestant Reformation.

Now, either or both could easily be original to a 17th-century Dutch interior: an interest in the art of the past didn’t spring up, whole and unprecedented, in the middle of the 19th century.

But they do suggest an awareness, on de Braekeleer’s part, of his own work’s resonance with the past he evokes.

wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days

by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…

beautiful-basque-country:

Folk Faces" by Asier Bastida.

These portraits are part of an exhibition held in the Bilbao underground to promote the 39th International Folkore Festival of Portugalete (July 24th-27th).

If only the world remained as colourful and personal as in these portraits…